Tuesday, April 25, 2006

Peter Maxwell Davies' "The Golden Rule" for Queen's 80th

Birthday service tribute to Queen at 80

From the Telegraph - 23/04/2006

The Queen has been praised for giving the nation "heart" during a special service of thanksgiving to mark her 80th birthday.
Hundreds of people filled St George's Chapel in the precincts of historic Windsor Castle to celebrate her landmark age.
The Queen's actual birthday was celebrated on Friday with a mix of public and private events - a traditional Royal walkabout and a family dinner hosted by the Prince of Wales for his "darling Mama".
But today the focus was a Christian service, taking account of the Queen's role as Head of the Church of England, a position she views as deeply important.
The Rt Reverend David Conner, the Dean of Windsor, paid tribute to the monarch's "sense of calmness, serenity and stillness" in his sermon at St George's Chapel.
He singled out the Queen's Christian faith, saying it was the "very bedrock" of her life.
"On this particular St George's Day, in St George's Chapel, family and friends and neighbours have gathered to join in thanksgiving for the birthday of our Queen," Bishop David told the congregation, which included senior royals, friends of the monarchy and staff.
"As we do so, I have a hunch that every one of us will be expressing gratitude, for some kind of encouragement received as we have tried, in our ordinary lives, to be decent and to care.
"Your Majesty, not so much through word as by unselfconscious good example, you encourage us; you give us heart."
Among the 700 guests were former prime ministers Baroness Thatcher and Sir John Major, Earl Spencer, the brother of Diana, Princess of Wales, and the Agha Khan.
A special birthday prayer written for the occasion began the proceedings in the ornate 15th century chapel as voices of the choir filled the historic building.
An anthem by the Poet Laureate Andrew Motion was also performed. "The Golden Rule", written as a birthday tribute, was sung by the choir and set to music by the Master of The Queen's Music Sir Peter Maxwell Davies.


Tribute to 'steadfast' Queen

From the Daily Mail - 23rd April 2006

The Queen's enduring qualities of constancy, serenity and her ability to give the nation "heart" were praised at a special service of thanksgiving to mark her 80th birthday.
The Right Reverend David Connor expressed the country's "gratitude" to the Monarch as the Royal family, dignitaries and other guests gathered together in St George's Chapel in the precincts of historic Windsor Castle.
The senior cleric, also Dean of Windsor, paid tribute to the Queen's "sense of calmness, serenity and stillness" telling the congregation during his sermon: "...I have a hunch that everyone of us will be expressing gratitude, for some kind of encouragement received as we have tried, in our ordinary lives, to be decent and to care.
"Your Majesty, not so much through word as by unselfconscious good example, you encourage us; you give us heart."
The congregation listened intently to the dignified and solemn service of readings and hymns in the historic chapel which began with a birthday prayer written to mark the Queen's milestone year.
During the thanksgiving service an anthem called The Golden Rule, by Poet Laureate Andrew Motion, was featured, set to music by the Master of the Queen's Music Sir Peter Maxwell Davies, and sung by the choir.
The Monarch, wearing a pale sky-blue coat and matching hat with orange trim, sat at the head of the congregation next to the Duke of Edinburgh with the Prince of Wales, Duchess of Cornwall and Princes William and Harry further along the pew.
Among the 700 guests were former prime ministers Baroness Thatcher and Sir John Major, Earl Spencer, the brother of Diana, Princess of Wales, and the Aga Khan.
Also present was Princess Michael of Kent, who is at the centre of reports in the News of the World today that she shared a romantic break in Venice with a Russian millionaire toy boy. Her spokesman has denied that the 61-year-old princess is having an affair with furniture tycoon Mikhail Kravchenko.
The Queen's actual birthday was celebrated on Friday with a mix of public and private events - a traditional Royal walkabout and a family dinner hosted by the Prince of Wales for his "darling Mama".


Service pays tribute to the 'serene' Queen

From the Guardian - Monday April 24, 2006

The Queen's enduring qualities of constancy, serenity and her ability to give the nation "heart" were praised yesterday at a service of thanksgiving to mark her 80th birthday.
The Rt Rev David Connor expressed the country's "gratitude" to the monarch as the royal family, dignitaries and other guests gathered together in St George's Chapel in the precincts of Windsor Castle. During the service The Golden Rule, written as a birthday tribute by the poet laureate, Andrew Motion, and set to music by the master of the Queen's music, Sir Peter Maxwell Davies, was sung by the choir.


Hundreds hail 'Elizabeth our Queen'

By Laura Roberts
From the Scotsman - 24-Apr-06

THE Queen's enduring "calmness, serenity and stillness" were praised yesterday in a thanksgiving service held at Windsor to mark her 80th birthday.
More than 700 guests and nearly 40 members of the Royal Family listened attentively to traditional blessings, lessons and prayers led by the Dean of Windsor, the Right Rev David Conner, in St George's Chapel.
Among the congregation was Princess Michael of Kent, who last night denied speculation that she is having an affair with a Russian furniture tycoon 21 years her junior.
The accusations, published in a Sunday newspaper, threatened to overshadow the celebration on St George's Day, but Princess Michael, accompanied by her husband, Prince Michael of Kent, and their son, Lord Freddie Windsor, smiled as she sat in the second row of the chapel behind Prince William.
The princess, 61, was photographed while on a trip to Venice with Mikhail Kravchenko and pictured kissing and holding hands. The pair stayed at the Cipriani Hotel in a private apartment for four nights from 30 March.
Simon Astaire, the spokesman for Princess Michael, last night denied there was any romantic relationship, and said: "It is a warm friendship, that is all." He claimed they met in Venice to discuss plans for new textile designs, after being introduced at a textile fair in Moscow late last year.
Yesterday, the Queen, wearing a Stewart Parvin duck egg blue silk outfit, sat in the front row during the service, next to the Duke of Edinburgh.
The Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall, who had their marriage blessed in the chapel last year, were in the same pew along with princes William and Harry. Several rows behind sat Princess Diana's brother, Earl Spencer. One of the few notable royal absences was the Queen's granddaughter, Zara Phillips.
Other distinguished guests included Baroness Thatcher, Sir John Major, Sir Edmund Hillary and King Constantine and Queen Anne-Marie of Greece.
"Elizabeth our Queen" was praised in the sermon by the Dean of Windsor for her calmness, serenity, steadfastness and stamina. He also paid tribute to her strong Christian faith.
The congregation heard an anthem written by the poet laureate, Andrew Motion, and set to music by the master of the Queen's music, Sir Peter Maxwell Davies. It was described as more sombre in tone than uplifting.
During the service, a collection was taken, during which the Queen produced a crisp note from her handbag and placed it into the bag - disproving the widely held belief that she doesn't carry money.
The service ended with a rendition of the national anthem by the congregation, and crowds braved the rain to watch the guests file out on to Windsor Castle's precinct.

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